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Signs You Might Have Diabetes


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  • Grand Poobah
Denise

  What are the MAIN symptoms of DIABETES?  

 

People who think they might have diabetes must visit a doctor for assessment, testing and diagnosis.

 

 

They might have SOME or NONE of the following symptoms: 

 

***  Frequent Urination (polyuria)

 

***  Excessive thirst (polydipsia)

 

***  Unexplained weight loss

 

***  Weight Gain

 

***  Extreme Constant Hunger (polyphagia)

 

***  Sudden Vision Changes (blurred)

 

***  Tingling or numbness in hands or feet

 

***  Flu-like symptoms - feeling very tired and weak most of the time

 

***  Very dry skin

 

***  Sores or cuts and bruises that heal slowly

 

***  More infections than usual (frequent urinary or vaginal infections)

 

***  Recurring gum or skin infections

 

***  Breath may have smell of acetone

 

***  Rapid breathing or hyperventilating (called Kussmaul breathing)

 

***  Glucose (sugar) found in urine (called glycosuria)

 

***  Hyperglycemia (high levels of sugar in blood) 

 

***  Nausea, vomiting or stomach pains may accompany some of these symptoms in the

abrupt onset of insulin-dependent diabetes (Now called Type 1 diabetes)

 

 

 

PREDIABETES

 

The vast majority of patients with type 2 diabetes initially had prediabetes. Their blood glucose levels where higher than normal, but not high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. The cells in the body are becoming resistant to insulin.

Studies have indicated that even at the prediabetes stage, some damage to the circulatory system and the heart may already have occurred.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Grand Poobah
Denise

What Is Prediabetes?

 

 

The vast majority of patients with type 2 diabetes initially had prediabetes. Their blood glucose levels where higher than normal, but not high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. The cells in the body are becoming resistant to insulin.

Studies have indicated that even at the prediabetes stage, some damage to the circulatory system and the heart may already have occurred.

 

 

 

What are the symptoms of insulin resistance and prediabetes?

Insulin resistance and prediabetes usually have no symptoms. People may have one or both conditions for several years without knowing they have them. Even without symptoms, health care providers can identify people at high risk by their physical characteristics, also known as risk factors.

 

People with a severe form of insulin resistance may have dark patches of skin, usually on the back of the neck. Sometimes people have a dark ring around their neck. Dark patches may also appear on elbows, knees, knuckles, and armpits. This condition is called acanthosis nigricans.

 

 

 

Who should be tested for prediabetes?

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that testing to detect prediabetes be considered in adults who are overweight or obese and have one or more additional risk factors for diabetes. Body Mass Index (BMI) can determine if a person is overweight or obese. However, not everyone who is overweight will get type 2 diabetes. People without these risk factors should begin testing at age 45.

 

 

Risk factors for prediabetes—in addition to being overweight or obese or being age 45 or older—include the following:

  • being physically inactive
  • having a parent or sibling with diabetes
  • having a family background that is African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander American
  • giving birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds
  • being diagnosed with gestational diabetes—diabetes that develops only during pregnancy
  • having high blood pressure—140/90 mmHg or above—or being treated for high blood pressure
  • HDL cholesterol level below 35 mg/dL or a triglyceride level above 250 mg/dL
  • having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • having prediabetes, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) on an earlier testing
  • having other conditions associated with insulin resistance, such as obesity or acanthosis nigricans
  • having CVD

 

If test results are normal, testing should be repeated at least every 3 years. Testing is important for early diagnosis. Catching prediabetes early gives people time to change their lifestyle and prevent type 2 diabetes and CVD. Health care providers may recommend more frequent testing depending on initial results and risk status.

 

In addition to weight, the location of excess fat on the body can be important. A waist measurement of 40 inches or more for men and 35 inches or more for women is linked to insulin resistance and increases a person’s risk for type 2 diabetes. This is true even if a person’s BMI falls within the normal range.

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Heisenberg / HNB

I read through these threads and they are very informative, thanks Denise. I've got several friends and co-workers who are diabetic, including a couple who have to do dialysis 3 days a week, but I've never really done much reading about diabetes until just now. Appreciate you posting this useful info.

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  • Grand Poobah
Denise

I read through these threads and they are very informative, thanks Denise. I've got several friends and co-workers who are diabetic, including a couple who have to do dialysis 3 days a week, but I've never really done much reading about diabetes until just now. Appreciate you posting this useful info.

 

Thank you.  It's become sort of a pet project. 

I still have to post about treatment for the different types of Diabetes and complications.

Perhaps some miscellaneous information.....

Then I'll be finished.    :)

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  • 5 months later...
  • Members

Wow thanks Denise, I believe it's time to go see the doctor I think I know what is wrong with me now. The tingling of my hands and feet bruises and sores slowly healing UTI's and I did have gestational diabetes and have a lot of native American in me and have been losing weight and when I miss a meal I am freezing cold. Tired all the time. I just thought I was getting old late 30's. Weight 160 down from 200 in about 6 months. I did weigh 125-130 before getting pregnant. I ate everything in site when I got pregnant. Go out to eat and order the Nibbler meal and the chicken strip salad from zaxbys just an example and a milk shake lol. Okay, I will be making an appointment....I appreciate it Denise! Lots of diabetes in my family. This is an old thread but glad I found it!

 

Thanks again,

 

P :)

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jthompson27566

Just diagnosed Type 2 diabetic 2 years ago. Messed around with the family doc, reading the material, trying to put together a meal plan when in all honesty didn't have a plan. Took my wife and daughter's advice, went to see a endocrinologist, best advice of my life. Put me with a nutritionist, changed my diet, I've lost about 25 lbs, always been a walker but bad eater, now eating better, feeling better, actually started running a little. A1c was 6.9 12 months ago, 6 months ago 6.0. I have a ways to go but feeling better than I've felt in a long, long, time. I take metformin to help control blood sugar. Wish I had taken action years ago, might not be here now.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Members

Just diagnosed Type 2 diabetic 2 years ago. Messed around with the family doc, reading the material, trying to put together a meal plan when in all honesty didn't have a plan. Took my wife and daughter's advice, went to see a endocrinologist, best advice of my life. Put me with a nutritionist, changed my diet, I've lost about 25 lbs, always been a walker but bad eater, now eating better, feeling better, actually started running a little. A1c was 6.9 12 months ago, 6 months ago 6.0. I have a ways to go but feeling better than I've felt in a long, long, time. I take metformin to help control blood sugar. Wish I had taken action years ago, might not be here now.

 

  Its never to late my friend,

It could have been worse. Diet is everything when it comes to diabetes. Medication too! Keep your diet under control and make sure you are going to periodic medical exams. Its cheaper to prevent than to treat.

 Be well :)

 

PS: Sorry for my english, its not my native language.

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Just diagnosed Type 2 diabetic 2 years ago. Messed around with the family doc, reading the material, trying to put together a meal plan when in all honesty didn't have a plan. Took my wife and daughter's advice, went to see a endocrinologist, best advice of my life. Put me with a nutritionist, changed my diet, I've lost about 25 lbs, always been a walker but bad eater, now eating better, feeling better, actually started running a little. A1c was 6.9 12 months ago, 6 months ago 6.0. I have a ways to go but feeling better than I've felt in a long, long, time. I take metformin to help control blood sugar. Wish I had taken action years ago, might not be here now.

Hi JT,

Why do you say you wish you had taken action years ago? If you mean you think you might have prevented Dm2 onset, maybe you could have, maybe not. Do you have any complications? A 6.0 is quite respectable and just a .point a way from being in the 5's club. Remember you don't have to conquer the world to control diabetes. Lose just 5-7% of your weight and exercise for 30 minutes daily. Recently I saw a news report that said that even exercising 10 min here and 10 minutes there during the day contributes to the overall 30 minute minimum. Also remember that depression is a symptom of dm2. I don't mean major depressive disorder, but being depressed is a natural side effect of the condition so how you feel is natural.

When dx'd I started with an a1c of 7.8 (now 5.7) and knew nothing about nutrition. Now, portion control and nutritional analysis is a part of daily living. I lost 72 lbs and run daily. I feel healthier now than I have in many years. But... It wasn't that hard, believe it or not. What was hard was how I felt mentally. For me it changed over time with support of family, etc. I am healthier today with dm2 than I was years ago without dm2. I examine my feet daily, get dilated retinal exams, test daily, and check my a1c every 3 months. It's part of a healthier life for me.

You are not alone my friend. Keep up the great work! You may soon be able to get off metformin. Many people manage dm2 with diet and exercise.

Regards"

PR

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  • 3 months later...
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jthompson27566

PR.

Just like most folks wish I had paid more attention to the signs. As it is through diet, regularly schedule visits with a endocrinologist, diet, and exercise, I have dropped 20-25 lbs, walking daily, watching my diet, counting carbs, and have lowered my a1c to a respectable 5.8 still high risk but better than when it started. The biggest thing is discipline about eating and exercising. Last but not least my endocrinologist said that if I had started taking Metformin earlier probably would have never been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Endo said that people that were at high risk should talk to their doctors about metformin. Apparently it's one of the better medicines for your body and is usually given to people like me that are elevated but not bad enough to start insulin. If you are not taking it and are at a high risk, something you should definitely consider.

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  • 1 year later...
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Benz_lover

How do stims effect your blood sugar if you are pre-diabetic?

Edited by Benz_lover
mispelling
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  • 8 months later...
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Scootover88

Newbie here, had no idea there was a diabetes section, but glad to see it! T1D here, going on 8 years this month. I was diagnosed as a sophomore in college. Im a pumper, but started with shots. It's a pain, but on the upside, I never have a problem getting my gear at the farm ;)

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  • Moderators.
2earls

I'm borderline diabetic myself. That's an improvement but still find myself having problems and right now, the vision issues are back and driving me crazy.

I would be interested in how some of the popular meds discussed here affect blood sugar and diabetes as I have never studied up on this.

 

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Scootover88
8 hours ago, 2earls said:

I'm borderline diabetic myself. That's an improvement but still find myself having problems and right now, the vision issues are back and driving me crazy.

I would be interested in how some of the popular meds discussed here affect blood sugar and diabetes as I have never studied up on this.

 

I'm sorry to hear your having problems @2earls, never fun :(. Ah, the blurred vision. That was my final clue to go to the doctor when I was first diagnosed. Haven't dealt with it since, but it was like constantly being in a state of just waking up and blinking your eyes to try to clear the blurry sight with no success.

Since T1 and T2 are such different diseases in reality, I can't be confident that effects would be the same for both, but in theory they should. Individuals can also vary greatly in BG sensitivity. I personally experience big spikes in my BG when I get overly stressed, but being ill doesn't affect me much (unless it's an infection), whereas some diabetics have a horrible time trying to keep their BG under control when they get sick. 

For the most part, the actual meds I've taken have never directly affected my BG negatively. I mostly do PKs, some beñz0s and @ddy. However, some of them, especially the @ make me lose my appetite, and I have to force myself to eat so I don't go low. The effects of others (mostly the PKs) obviously make me much more relaxed, and I tend to get very lax on checking my BG and often forget to give myself insulin as a result, so not good. 

The biggest effects I've dealt with have been from several abscesses. Mostly at my pump insertion site from going to long between changes (see lax above!) and one from my roa of PKs. The infection causes a huge spike in BG and has sent me into DKA, twice with pancreatitis. I've spent as long as 12 days in ICU for it. The bad part is, I didn't used to mind the pain and almost dying so much because it meant I got to lay in bed, let nurses check my BG and handle my insulin, and have pretty much unlimited dill pickles IV. I used to get admitted at least 2-3x a year. I finally cleaned my act up and have stayed out of the hospital for over 3 years now (besides the time a horse fell on me at work and shattered my collar bone and I had to have a metal plate put in, unrelated to T1D obviously). 

The biggest issue I ever had was the one time I got cotton fever. I had never had it before and I had been in the hospital the month before for a pump site abscess. I didn't know what was going on and assumed it was diabetes related so I went to the ER. I was in for 4 days and never diagnosed. It wasn't until later I realized what had happened. But because of my diabetes, my body had a hard time recovering and I was quarantined for a while because my white blood cell count dropped dangerously low. Ended up having to have a spinal tap, worst thing ever. From what understand, a mild case of cotton fever can usually knock a person out for a day or two but I wasn't right for over a week. Then I had to go back to the ER when my left arm went completely numb with intermittent sever stabbing pain never got that figured out either...

In general, most of the popular meds I see here aren't known for having direct effects on BG. Over the counter stuff, like cough syrups, are more likely to but it's always mentioned on the label. A quick internet search ("med name" diabetes) and scan of the results will give you an immediate idea. I think individually the best thing to do is trial them yourself. Log your BG, and if it was within 2 hours after eating or not, take the med and then log a 30 min and 2 hour BG. Do this a couple times and you should have a pretty clear idea of if/how it affects you. If you do this and don't mind, maybe you could post the results to help other diabetics here out. I'll try to do the same. Maybe a thread of its own for easy reference?

Hope this helps a bit!

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2earls

@Scootover88 thanks for the great, informative, post. Stress? Interesting. Never really considered that. Aside from the blurry vision, this is the second time I've burst a blood vessel in my eye. The result is constantly seeing a black squiggly line. Annoying.

I've become pretty lax about checking my BG and I thank you for reviving this thread. It's reminding me not to mess around and start regular testing again. After the doc told me I'd improved, I kind of used it as an excuse to forget about it. I've had pancreatitus too, but have never heard of cotton fever. Sounds like you have been through more than I and that's scary enough to jolt me out of my laziness.

 

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Scootover88

Cotton fever is exclusively a result of IVing,  so no worries if you don't, but having never had it, I immediately assumed it was diabetes related. 

I know what you mean, I got my a1c down to 5.7 in the first 6 months of being diagnosed, was very proud of myself, and then let it go to hell from there.... Having an insulin pump helps, but also makes it so much easier so it almost ends up hurting in the end because I don't monitor it as closely as I should. 

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